Noticeboard

 

EXEMPT FROM WEARING A FACE COVERING?

Following the latest government advice with regards to face coverings -

If you are exempt please do not ask your doctor for a letter.

There is no requirement for evidence for exemption. It is sufficient for you to self-declare this.

If you wish to travel on public transport:

You can download and print a card and carry it with you. You may want to print it and wear it on a lanyard or attach it to your clothing. You can show it if you are asked why you are not wearing a face covering. You can also display it on your phone.

This is available on the Transport for London website below

https://tfl.gov.uk/campaign/face-coverings#on-this-page-2

 

https://tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/documents/face-covering-exemption-card.pdf

Dr Knox

We are sad to be saying goodbye to Dr Ramona Knox.

Dr Knox is moving to the Midlands with her family and we will miss her greatly. Dr Knox has been a highly valued member of the team.

We wish Dr Knox and her family all the very best.

 

If you are a patient of Dr Knox you will be reallocated a new GP but not until the pandemic level is lower – at the moment as I hope you appreciate it is all hands to the deck. We do recommend that you try to see the same GP for continuity. More on new appointment availability coming soon.

Blood Tests

blood_tests_4A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken for testing in a laboratory. Blood tests have a wide range of uses and are one of the most common types of medical test. For example, a blood test can be used to:

  • assess your general state of health
  • confirm the presence of a bacterial or viral infection
  • see how well certain organs, such as the liver and kidneys, are functioning

You can always talk to your GP about what the tests are for and why. However a good resource is the www.patient.co.uk site. They have a lot of information about blood tests for you to read. Click this link to read more.

A blood test usually involves the phlebotomist taking a blood sample from a blood vessel in your arm. and the usual place for a sample is the inside of the elbow or wrist, where the veins are relatively close to the surface. Blood samples from children are most commonly taken from the back of the hand. The child's hand will be anaesthetised (numbed) with a special cream before the sample is taken.

You can find out more about blood tests, their purpose and the way they are performed on the NHS Choices website.

 
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