Noticeboard

 

EXEMPT FROM WEARING A FACE COVERING?

Following the latest government advice with regards to face coverings -

If you are exempt please do not ask your doctor for a letter.

There is no requirement for evidence for exemption. It is sufficient for you to self-declare this.

If you wish to travel on public transport:

You can download and print a card and carry it with you. You may want to print it and wear it on a lanyard or attach it to your clothing. You can show it if you are asked why you are not wearing a face covering. You can also display it on your phone.

This is available on the Transport for London website below

https://tfl.gov.uk/campaign/face-coverings#on-this-page-2

 

https://tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/documents/face-covering-exemption-card.pdf

Dr Knox

We are sad to be saying goodbye to Dr Ramona Knox.

Dr Knox is moving to the Midlands with her family and we will miss her greatly. Dr Knox has been a highly valued member of the team.

We wish Dr Knox and her family all the very best.

 

If you are a patient of Dr Knox you will be reallocated a new GP but not until the pandemic level is lower – at the moment as I hope you appreciate it is all hands to the deck. We do recommend that you try to see the same GP for continuity. More on new appointment availability coming soon.

When should I go to A&E?

choose well logocwThere are over 21 million attendances at accident and emergency (A&E) departments each year, many of which are not appropriate.

Due to the rising demand and pressures at A&E departments, Park Road Surgery are working with Surrey Heath CCG to try to reduce unnecessary attendances 

A&E departments assess and treat patients with serious injuries or illnesses. Generally, you should only visit A&E or call 999 for life-threatening emergencies, such as:

  • loss of consciousness
  • acute confused state and fits that are not stopping
  • persistent, severe chest pain
  • breathing difficulties
  • severe bleeding that cannot be stopped

 

If it is not an immediate emergency call NHS 111 The service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and can provide medical advice and advise you on the best local service to offer the care you need.

Less severe injuries can be treated in minor injuries services and NHS walk-in centres, which can treat patients without an appointment.

For illnesses that are not life threatening you should first contact your GP Outside of normal surgery hours you can still phone your GP, but you will usually be directed to an out-of-hours service. The out-of-hours period is from 8pm to 8am on weekdays, and all day at weekends and on bank holidays. During out-of-hours periods you can also call NHS 111



 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website